Thinking About Thinking: The Anchoring Effect

Sometimes it’s frightening when we examine our own decision making — especially when we realize how random and arbitrary it all is. It can be unsettling to know our judgment can be so heavily influenced by randomness — and it happens every day. Daniel Kahneman covers this in  Thinking, Fast and Slow, a bizare tour of the mind where he outlines the faults and…

A Meaningful vs. A Moral-ful Life

Anthropology is a tricky business. Sometimes it’s difficult to separate the real world from the imagined. A new book by Susan Wolf  tackles a similar quandary — when we start to think about if a meaningful life must be a moral life? It is written in ‘Meaning in Life and Why it Matters’ that there are values we associate with a good…

Semiology: No Charcoal in your Hotel Room

Traveling globally so much I can’t help but become a student of semiotics. I find it fascinating to see how typical information is communicated differently in unique regions.  Semiotics, which is a general philosophical theory of signs and symbols dealing especially with their function in both artificially constructed and natural languages, is very cool and a great…

Altering Reality through Observation

Heard an interesting chat with UC Psychologist Jonathan Schooler on NPR where he discussed how the way we observe our surroundings might actually alter those surroundings.  Very intriguing for Strategists, as we are always observing — be it in focus groups, in-homes or just out on the streets. So does active observation actually change the nature of…

Lemon Juice, Invisibility and Cognitive Distortion

Does rubbing your face with lemon juice make you invisible to video cameras?  It’s the Anosognosic Dilemma. How can we ever know something is wrong if we don’t know what that something is? If I don’t know. And I know that I don’t know it. That’s fine. Because I do know about it. But what about the unknown unknowns? Just…